The team from Thermo Fischer Scientific Norway accepts the Innovation Award. From the left: Director of Research Erlend Ragnhildstveit, Minister of Trade and Industry Monica Mæland, CEO Ole Dahlberg and Senior Researcher Geir Fonnum. Photo: Sindre Mekjan/Forskningsrådet

Thermo Fisher Scientific Wins Innovation Award

The Research Council of Norway has given Thermo Fisher Scientific the prestigious Innovation Award for their Dynabeads.

 

The Oslo Cancer Cluster member Thermo Fischer Scientific was awarded the prize for developing an entirely new variant of an existing product, making it possible to analyse human genes quickly and effectively and improve diagnostic testing and patient treatment.

This is the technology known as «Dynabeads» that makes faster and cheaper DNA-sequencing accesible.

– The award means a lot to us as a company, and to everybody who has been working on product, production and launch during these years. It is an acknowledgement that investment, cooperation and important global products are noticed, says Ole Dahlberg, CEO at Thermo Fischer Scientific Norway.

Vital role in Norwegian biotech
Thermo Fisher Scientific is one of Norway´s leading biotechs and among the most profitable. The company has played a vital role in Norwegian biotech with the development of «Dynabeads», used all over the world to separate, isolate and manipulate biological materials.

Thermo Fisher’s Dynabeads are used in basic research, in billions of diagnostic tests, as well as in immunotherapy.

In May this year, Thermo Fisher Scientific was nominated for the “Norway’s smartest industrial company” award for the same technology. The smart element was using the beads in a completely new way on a microchip in combination with semiconductor technology. This link between biotech and electronics has created the instruments from Thermo Fisher which we now see in research institutes and diagnostic labs all over the world.

Ambitious research and development
– Thermo Fisher Scientific is carrying out an ambitious research and development effort in a very important area. The company is achieving this by using its own resources, seeking cooperation with exacting customers and drawing on public funding schemes from, among others, the Research Council of Norway. In this way, the company contributes to job creation as well as value creation, said Monica Mæland, Minister of Trade and Industry, according to The Research Council of Norway. She presented the Innovation Award during the Arendal Week in August.

The Research Council’s Innovation Award comprises a cash prize of NOK 500 000 and is given each year to a business or public entity that has demonstrated an outstanding ability to apply research results to create research-based innovation.

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