Audience at Cancer Crosslinks 2019

Top presentations from Cancer Crosslinks 2019

See them again or for the first time: videos from the Cancer Crosslinks 2019 presentations.

Cancer Crosslinks is Oslo Cancer Cluster’s annual, open conference for the Norwegian oncology community. It offers a full-day educational program featuring distinguished international and national experts presenting recent advances in precision oncology and cancer immunotherapy.

More than 300 participants joined Cancer Crosslinks on 17 January 2019 and enjoyed excellent talks and discussions presented by leading international oncologists and researchers and their Norwegian colleagues.

 

The speakers’ top topics

The speakers discussed new insights into sensitivity and resistance and features of the tumour microenvironment critical for the clinical course. They also discussed emerging tissue agnostic biomarkers, where «tissue agnostic” refers to the ability to develop therapies based upon biomarkers or other molecular targets to treat a disease. A biomarker is a measurable indicator of a biological state or condition.

Other topics were learnings from cancer molecular evolution studies, and how big data approaches are used to improve patient care. Together with an engaged audience, the presenters were really connecting the dots for improved patient care in precision oncology.


Professor Naiyer Rizvi
, Director of thoracic oncology and of immunotherapeutics for the division of haematology and oncology at Columbia University Medical Center, New York, gave the opening keynote in the form of a video presentation. He is an internationally recognized leader in the treatment of lung cancer and immunotherapy drug development.

In his presentation, titled: “Sensitivity and resistance to immuno-oncology: Biological insights and their translation into precision treatment”, Prof. Rizvi also addressed the question “What happens when the doctors expect the patient to respond to immunotherapy, but then the patient does not?”

WATCH PROF. RIZVI

Professor Rizvi

 

Dr. Aaron Goodman, MD, is a haematologist and medical oncologist specialized in treating a variety of blood cancers. He holds a position as Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health in La Jolla, California.

During his talk, Dr. Goodman presented tumour mutational burden and other emerging tissue agnostic biomarkers for response to cancer immunotherapy and how to implement these into the clinic. He also spoke about his experience from the Rare Tumour Clinic in San Diego, where they perform a comprehensive molecular profiling for about 22-25% of cancer patients with rare tumours. The goal is to identify a matching therapy for each patient.

After his presentation, Dr. Goodman commented to Oslo Cancer Cluster:

“We started by doing data collections and help patients and learn at the same time. It is a benefit that we at least have the patient’s data and experience with that patient so that we can go forward and help the next patient.” Aaron Goodman

WATCH DR. GOODMAN

Dr Goodman

 

Dr. Randy F. Sweis is an Assistant Professor in the haematology/oncology section at the University of Chicago. He works with cancer immunology, developmental therapeutics and biomarkers, with a clinical interest in phase 1 clinical trials and genitourinary malignancies. His laboratory research involves the identification and targeting of tumour-intrinsic immunotherapy resistance pathways.

During Cancer Crosslinks, Dr. Sweis presented his work on immunophenotypes: “The T cell-inflamed tumour microenvironment as a biomarker and its clinical implications.”

WATCH DR. SWEIS

Dr. Sweis

 

Dr. Marco Gerlinger is a clinician scientist at the Center for Evolution and Cancer at the Institute of Cancer Research in London and a consultant Medical Oncologist in the GI Cancer Unit at Royal Marsden Hospital. He develops novel techniques to detect and track intra-tumour heterogeneity in solid tumours to define evolutionary plasticity and common evolutionary trajectories in cancers. Cancer cell plasticity is the ability of cancer cells to change their physiological characteristics.

Dr. Gerlinger shared the latest insights into cancer evolution and discussed the limits of predictability in precision cancer medicine. How can clinicians and researchers exploit important data on tumour development?

During his visit in Oslo, Dr. Gerlinger commented: “We have had fantastic discussions with an audience that is really well informed and brings up the challenges we are facing and the research we are doing.”

“This is the first time I have given a talk in Norway and obviously there is a lot going on here. I am already thinking about some collaborations, because there are some interesting advantages here through big tumour banks and cancer registries.” Dr. Marco Gerlinger

WATCH DR. GERLINGER

Dr Gerlinger

 

 

Professor Dr. med. Lars Bullinger is Professor of Hematology and Oncology and Medical Director of the Department of Hematology, Oncology and Tumor Immunology at Charité University Medicine Berlin.

He is a partner in the Innovative Medicines Initiative project HARMONY (Healthcare alliance for resourceful medicines offensive against neoplasms in haematology) aiming to use big data to deliver information that will help to improve the care of patients with haematologic cancers.

In his keynote speech he presented the “best of hematology from 2018” to the Cancer Crosslinks audience. He also addressed emerging therapeutic opportunities and the impact of big data for precision treatment in haematology.

WATCH PROF. DR. MED. LARS BULLINGER

Lars Bullinger

 

James Peach is the Precision Medicine Lead at UK Medicines Discovery Catapult, Alderly Park, UK. Prior to this role, he was the Managing Director at the main programme for Genomics England from 2013 to 2017. He presented his perspectives on the implementation of precision medicine in the UK and discussed the status, lessons learned and the way forward.

WATCH JAMES PEACH

James Peach


The expert panel
You can read more about how the Norwegian expert panel reacted to James Peach’s presentation and the state of precision medicine in Norway in the article below, also from Cancer Crosslinks 2019. The article contains a video of the panel debate.

Getting genomics into healthcare: look to the UK

 

Discussing health care at Cancer Crosslinks 2019

Getting genomics into healthcare: look to the UK

During Cancer Crosslinks 2019, one thing was crystal clear: there is a need to include broader genomic testing into treatments for cancer patients in Norway.

“We are lacking behind here in Norway!”

Professor Ola Myklebost, from the Department of Clinical Science at the University of Bergen, was definitely ready for action in the panel debate at Cancer Crosslinks 2019, fittingly named “Call for Action”.

The panel and the audience of about 300 people had just listened to the talk given by James Peach. He is the Precision Medicine Lead at UK Medicines Discovery Catapult, Alderly Park, and prior to this, he was the Managing Director at the main programme for Genomics England from 2013 to 2017 and led the UK’s Stratified Medicines Program.

Peach told the audience how they have been implementing precision medicine into the public health care system (NHS) in the UK, using genomic testing, during the last decade. He demonstrated how the industry is part of this public endeavour, how political support and investment contributed to industry development, and how they addressed complex issues like sharing health data and using artificial intelligence.

It started with very little.

“In 2010, we had no structure”, Peach told the audience.

 

James Peach presenting at Cancer Crosslinks 2019

Sequencing 100,000 genomes

Thanks to all the British cancer patients who consented to Genomics England using their data, and a lot of common public-private efforts, Genomics England has now reached its goal of sequencing 100,000 whole genomes from NHS patients, according to their webpage. It takes a lot to accomplish this number, but luckily there are things to learn from the UK effort.

“Circulating tumour DNA testing is absolutely necessary”, Peach said from the podium.

The Life Science Sector deal from the British government outlines this public-private effort. It shows how significant government commitment, funding and strategic actions triggered investment and initiatives from the life science industry. You can read the entire document at the official webpage of the British Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, following this link.

James Peach visited Norway earlier as a speaker at Cancer Crosslinks 2012. Returning now, he was truly surprised about the current state of precision medicine in Norway.

 

Concerned about Norway

In an interview with Oslo Cancer Cluster, James Peach shared a concern as an answer to the question “What impressions are you left with after this conference?” 

“It has left me quite concerned about the state of precision medicine in Norway. I thought you would be looking forward to the things you could do, but it turns out that there are actually some things that you should have done already.”

“Like what things?” 

“Like universal application of a cancer panel test that is commercially feasible and deals around getting your data shared appropriately.”

Do you think we can have a Genomics Norway?”

“Of course. It is probably about combining two things. One is that you got to get the basic stuff right. People need to have access to gene tests for their clinical care. Luckily the people here are a group of experts who are all connected to each other and who understand the system. It is not a massive system. I think there is a real chance to choose an area where Norway could do it exceptionally well. What that area is, is for you to choose.”

 

Concerns in Norway

Back in the panel discussion, Hege G. Russnes, Pathologist, Senior Consultant and Researcher at Oslo University Hospital, was getting involved:

“We need more information to help clinicians make therapy decisions. (…) Norway has no plan or recommendation for multi gene tests.”

Christian Kersten, Senior Consultant at the Center for Cancer Treatment at Sørlandet Hospital, agreed.

“I’m the clinician, I treat patients, patients die because of metastasis. I have been treating cancer patients for 20 years now and I feel it increasingly difficult to keep the trust of the patient.”

“If you ask the patients, they will sign the papers with consent of sharing data in 99% of the cases”, Myklebost added.

“We are only 5 million, we do not have to reinvent the wheel. Erna Solberg should invite James Peach for a cup of tea”, Christian Kersten said, finishing up the panel talk.

 

The entire panel debate is available to watch at the webcast webpage:

WATCH THE PANEL DEBATE

 

More on UK Medicines Discovery Catapult 

Did this brief article make you interested in the work that James Peach and UK Medicines Discovery Catapult does? In this short video, Peach explains the challenges with access to health data for drug discovery and how to overcome them:

 

More from Cancer Crosslinks 

We have more from Cancer Crosslinks 2019 coming up. Stay tuned and subscribe to our newsletter, and you will not miss videos of the talks and interviews with the other distinguished speakers at the conference.

Presenter at Cancer Crosslinks 2019.

Cancer Crosslinks LIVE streaming

Today, Thursday 17 January, we broadcast LIVE from our conference Cancer Crosslinks at Oslo Cancer Cluster Innovation Park.

Please join us and hear from a distinguished panel of international and Norwegian experts as they discuss the Next Wave of Precision Oncology, share new perspectives, and address the challenges and opportunities ahead. The subtitle of this year’s 11th Cancer Crosslinks is “Next Wave Precision Oncology – Connecting the Dots for Improved Patient Care”.

The broadcast starts at 9 AM and last until the conference ends at about 4 PM. Please follow the link to watch LIVE:

LIVESTREAM HERE

 

If you would like to know more about the international speakers at Cancer Crosslinks 2019, please read this article.

International speakers at Cancer Crosslinks 2019

International speakers at Cancer Crosslinks

How can research help implement the next wave of precision oncology for patients? Meet the experts behind the research.

 

These leading international experts are part of the programme at Oslo Cancer Cluster Innovation Park, 17 January.
Not signed up for the 11thCancer Crosslinks yet? Join in here!

 

Professor Naiyer Rizvi is an internationally recognized leader in the treatment of lung cancer and immunotherapy drug development. He is the director of both thoracic oncology and of immunotherapeutics for the division of haematology and oncology at Columbia University Medical Center, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, USA.

Prior to joining Columbia University Medical Center, his clinical research at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer played a significant role in the FDA approval path of a new class of immunotherapies, called immune checkpoint inhibitors, for melanoma and lung cancer.

Rizvi studies mechanisms of sensitivity and resistance to immunotherapy. Through genetic testing of tumours, he has been able to improve the understanding of why immune checkpoint inhibitors work in certain patients.

Rizvi is also studying why certain cancers do not respond to immune checkpoint inhibitors. This way we can find better ways to harness the immune system to attack cancer cells.

He oversees phase 1 immunotherapy research in solid tumours at Columbia University Medical Center and is conducting key clinical studies of novel immunotherapy drugs and immunotherapy combinations to help more patients in the fight against cancer.

Professor Naiyer Rizvi

During Cancer Crosslinks, Professor Rizvi will give the opening keynote speech titled: “Sensitivity and resistance to immuno-oncology: Biological insights and their translation into precision treatment”.

 

Dr. Aaron Goodman, MD, is a haematologist and medical oncologist specialized in treating a variety of blood cancers, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and multiple myeloma. He holds a position as Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health in La Jolla, California.

Dr. Goodman performs stem cell transplants for cancer treatment. He also treats people with rare haematologic disorders using experimental therapeutics.

His research interests include immunotherapy and cellular therapy treatment for haematologic malignancies and identifying biomarkers for response to immunotherapy.

Dr. Aaron Goodman

During Cancer Crosslinks, Dr. Aaron Goodman will present and discuss the clinical aspects of tumour mutational burden and other tissue agnostic biomarkers for cancer immunotherapy.

 

Dr. Randy F. Sweis is an Assistant Professor in the haematology/oncology section at the University of Chicago. He works with cancer immunology, developmental therapeutics and biomarkers, with a clinical interest in phase 1 clinical trials and genitourinary malignancies. His laboratory research involves the identification and targeting of tumour-intrinsic immunotherapy resistance pathways.

Dr. Sweis is the recipient of numerous awards. In 2017, he was elected to co-lead TimIOs, an international project aimed at tackling tumor heterogeneity to enhance immunotherapy responses supported by the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC).

Dr. Randy F. Sweis

During Cancer Crosslinks, Dr. Randy F. Sweis presents his work on immunophenotypes: The T cell-inflamed tumour microenvironment as a biomarker and its clinical implications.

 

Dr. Marco Gerlinger is a clinician scientist at the Center for Evolution and Cancer at the Institute of Cancer Research in London. He develops novel techniques to detect and track intra-tumour heterogeneity in solid tumours to define evolutionary plasticity and common evolutionary trajectories in cancers.

Dr. Gerlinger uses genomics technologies for treatment personalization. He treats patients with gastrointestinal cancers at The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust.

One of the key aims of his work is to develop strategies to improve predictive and prognostic biomarker performance and the efficacy of drug therapy in heterogeneous cancers.

He contributes to The Darwin Cancer Blog– on mutational evolution of cancer.

Dr. Marco Gerlinger

During Cancer Crosslinks, Dr. Marco Gerlinger will share the latest insights into cancer evolution and discuss the limits of predictability in precision cancer medicine. 

 

Professor Dr. med. Lars Bullinger is Professor of Hematology and Oncology and Medical Director of the Department of Hematology, Oncology and Tumor Immunology at Charité University Medicine Berlin.

He is a partner in the Innovative Medicines Initiative project HARMONY (Healthcare alliance for resourceful medicines offensive against neoplasms in haematology) aiming to use big data to deliver information that will help to improve the care of patients with haematologic cancers.

In this video from June, you get a preview of the subject he will talk about at Cancer Crosslinks: 

During Cancer Crosslinks, Dr. Lars Bullinger will give an international keynote speech about haematological cancers, emerging treatment opportunities and the impact of big data. 

 

James Peach is the Precision Medicine Lead at UK Medicines Discovery Catapult, Alderly Park, UK. Prior to this role, he was the Managing Director at the main programme for Genomics England from 2013 to 2017.

Peach is a precision medicine strategist and operational leader with investment, commercial and public sector experience across cancer, rare diseases, and genetics. James Peach gave the opening keynote at Cancer Crosslinks 2012 – at that time as the Director for Stratified Medicine at Cancer Research UK, London.

In this video James Peach explains the challenges with access to health data for drug discovery and how to overcome them:

During Cancer Crosslinks, James Peach will present his perspectives on the implementation of precision medicine in the UK and discuss the status, lessons learned and the way forward. 

 

Not signed up for Cancer Crosslinks yet? Join in here!

 

 

Norwegian life science on exhibition

The strong life science actors in Norway joined forces during the conference Nordic Life Science Days 2018.

Oslo Cancer Cluster aims to enhance the visibility of oncology innovation made in Norway by being a significant partner for international clusters, global biopharma companies and academic centres. We used the conference Nordic Life Science Days 2018 in Stockholm this September week to show the growing Norwegian life science environment.

The Norwegian stand
From 2015 onward, we have had a Norwegian stand promoting Norwegian healthcare and life science industry together with other life science actors in Norway. Our partners this year were Norway Health TechAleapUniversity of Oslo: Life ScienceThe Life Science ClusterInvent2NORINNansen Neuroscience NetworkLMI, Centre for Digital Life NorwayInnovation Norway and The Norwegian Research Council. Together we represent the essence of Norwegian Life Science.

 

The Norwegian delegation with Ambassador Christian Syse visited the stand in 2018. From the left: Jutta Heix, International Advisor at Oslo Cancer Cluster, Christian Syse, the Norwegian Ambassador to Sweden, Tina Norlander, Senior Advisor in Innovation Norway and Jeppe Bucher, Intern at the Royal Norwegian Embassy in Stockholm.

 

A European meeting place
There are several important meeting places for life science actors in Europe, such as BIO-Europe, BIO-Europe Spring and Nordic Life Science Days at the top of the list. Oslo Cancer Cluster is the oncology partner at the Nordic Life Science Days.

Are you interested in what the big oncology session during the Nordic Life Science Days 2018 was all about? The topic was cancer immunotherapy, also known as immuno-oncology.

This article gives you the highlights of the session.

More Nordic collaboration
As a region, the Nordic countries are of international importance in the field of cancer research and innovation, especially in precision medicine, and Oslo Cancer Cluster participates in advancing Nordic collaboration. Oslo Cancer Cluster also engages in more cancer specific European events. One example is the Association for Cancer Immunotherapy Meeting (CIMT), which is the largest European meeting in the field of cancer immunotherapy.

Read more about our international work

The next wave in cancer immunotherapy

What is driving the next wave of innovation in cancer immunotherapy?

This was the question the experts tried to answer in the oncology session of the conference Nordic Life Science Days in Stockholm 12 September.

International experts from pharma, biotech, academia and the investment community discussed how different approaches to innovative cancer treatments could address challenges and shape the next wave of innovation in cancer immunotherapy, also known as immuno-oncology.

They touched upon approaches such as big data, personalized medicine, new targets and lessons from neuroscience.

Over the past few years, the rapid development of novel cancer immunotherapy approaches has fundamentally disrupted the oncology space. Cancer immunotherapy has not only become a key component of cancer therapy, but it has also reshaped priorities in oncology research and development (R&D) across the industry, with unprecedented clinical success in certain cancer types continuing to fuel record investment and partnering activity.

As of today, more than 2.000 immuno-oncology agents, including checkpoint-inhibitors, vaccines, oncolytic viruses and cellular therapies are in preclinical or clinical development.

Read more about the cellular therapy research of Oslo Cancer Cluster members Oslo University Hospital and Zelluna.

Why so little effect? 
Despite all of this promising research, only a minority of patients benefits from effective and durable immuno-oncology treatments. Why is this happening?

Part of the answer is found in resistance or unexplained lack of response. This could be addressed through a better understanding of optimal timing of therapy, better combination therapy design, or improved patient selection. Another part of the answer lies in a lack of novel targets and of an overall better understanding of specific immune mechanisms. This lack of understanding is becoming a roadblock to further advance in this research space.

What can the experts do about this? It turns out they have several approaches. Two of the main ones include big data and turning so-called cold tumours hot.

Big data will expand
“We believe that this can be changed by adding deep and broad data from multiple sources”, said Richa Wilson, Associate Director, Digital and Personalized Healthcare in Roche Partnering.

“We use the words meaningful data at scale, that means high quality data with a purpose: to answer key scientific questions”, she said at the session.

These data will continue to evolve from clinical trials and aggregated trials and registries and in the future from real time and linked data. There was about 150 exabytes health data in 2015 and in 2020 it is expected to grow into 2300 exabytes, mainly from digital health apps and scans from the hospitals, Oslo Cancer Cluster member Roche presented.

Hot and cold tumours 
Emilio Erazo-Fischer, Associate Director of Global Oncology Business Development at Boehringer Ingelheim explained the cold and hot tumours and how the cold tumours can be turned hot and thus open for cancer immunology treatment. It is well explained in this short film by Oslo Cancer Cluster member Boehringer Ingelheim

Martin Bonde, CEO of Oslo Cancer Cluster member Vaccibody also presented how they try to turn the cold tumours hot.

The Norwegian company Vaccibody is a leader in the field of cancer vaccines and they are very ambitious. They currently have a trial for melanoma, lung, bladder, renal, head and neck cancer.

The impact of stress
Erica Sloan is the group leader of the Cancer & Neural-Immune Research Laboratory in Monash University in Australia. She gave a talk on how neural signalling stops immunotherapy working. The researchers at Monash University have led mouse studies where the nervous system is stressed. They show that immunotherapies fail unless peripheral neural stresses are excluded.

The threat of a cancer diagnosis is stressful, as are most certainly cancer and cancer treatments. The tumour micro environment inside the cells can hear the stress signal, that is adrenalin.

“So what can we do about it?” Erica Sloan asked, before she answered:

“Treating with beta blockers. Blocking neural signalling prevents cancer progression. It also has an effect on immunotherapies.”

Erica Sloan is the group leader for the Cancer & Neural-Immune Research Laboratory in Monash University, Australia. She gave an introduction to the effect of neural signalling on tumour cells during the NLSDays in Stockholm 2018.

“Could stress be responsible for non responders?”, the moderator Gaspar Taroncher-Oldenburg from Nature Publishing Group asked her in the panel. 

“Absolutely, neural signalling can be responsible for this. And the exciting thing with data sharing here is that it can allow us to see and understand the rest of the patients’ biology. We need to look more at the patients’ physiology and not just the tumour biology” she said. 

Promising treatment for late stage cancer

MetAction has used targeted gene therapy to give patients with metastatic cancer a treatment method. The future of this work is now in danger.

Late stage cancer is still a real challenge for modern medicine. The gene mutations multiply and are difficult to control. However, the research group MetAction, based at the Oslo University Hospital, has used targeted gene therapy to give patients with metastatic cancer a treatment method.

The results have been very promising, but all the good work could go to waste.

Targeted Gene Theraphy has been described as one of the new important weapons in the fight against cancer for two decades now. Norwegian hospitals still lack an infrastructure to facilitate this type of treatment.

Meet MetAction
MetAction started as a research project in 2014 to explore the possibilities of targeted gene therapy, but ended in 2017 because of a lack of funding. The project made use of modern genetic tools, combined with knowledge across the cancer treatment spectrum, to help patients with late stage cancer.

Cancer Specialist Anne Hansen Ree explained how it all started at this year’s Cancer Crosslinks in January.

– We had this idea to use targeted gene therapy for people who suffered from late stage cancer to deal with the types of mutations common for this group, she said.

With this idea as a backdrop they started developing a research project.

– To do this we had to put together quite a large project with a lot of new diagnostic tools, as well as specialists with the knowledge to interpret the data and find patients that were willing to join the study, she explained.

During the project, MetAction found that they could give at least half of the patients in their study a treatment based on the genetical data collected.

A patient group previously labelled “terminally ill” could actually receive effective treatment.

You can read about the cancer patient Grete and how she was successfully treated with late stage stomach cancer by MetAction in this article in the Norwegian newspaper VG (in Norwegian).

Knowledge in danger
All the knowledge and competence the MetAction group has established in this field is now in danger of disappearing.

– It’s sad to see that all the good work from this project could vanish and that a patient group loses out on a possible treatment method, said molecular pathologist and doctor Hege Russnes.

Both Russnes and Ree emphasized that the research group both want to and should continue.

Join the debate
Last year at the yearly political get-together event “Arendalsuka” Oslo Cancer Cluster and meeting-co-hosts posted the question: “Why can’t we have a second-opinion board for patients that have run out of options, like in Denmark?” Now that a Norwegian Expert Panel is about to come to fruition–as promised by the Norwegian Minister of Health, Bent Høie–it presents an excellent possibility to include personalized gene treatment as a viable treatment option for patients with late stage cancer. We will discuss this possibility during our meeting in Arendal next week.

8 AM Wednesday 15 August, MetAction will present their project and we will discuss possibilities for future cancer treatment as part of this year’s Arendalsuka. Come and join our event there.

Or simply follow our live stream on Facebook!

Bekjemper kreft med gentilpasset behandling

Gentilpasset behandling har siden begynnelsen av 2000-tallet blitt beskrevet som et av de nye, viktige våpnene som kan bekjempe kreft.

Hør forsker Hege G. Russnes og professor Anne Hansen Ree, her fra Cancer Crosllinks i januar i år, fortelle om deres forskningsprosjekt MetAction, og hvordan de tar i bruk gentilpasset behandling for å gi et behandlingstilbud til en pasientgruppe som har manglet det tidligere. Nå avsluttes prosjektet og du kan høre her hvorfor forskerne synes det er både feil og trist.

Forskningsprosjektet, som varte fra 2014 til 2017, ble ledet av Ree, kreftforsker og professor Gunhild Mari Mælandsmo, molekylærpatolog og lege Hege Russnes ved Oslo universitetssykehus, samt kreftkirurg og lege Kjersti Flatmark.

I forrige uke fikk de også forsiden på VG. Og det med god grunn: Ved bruk av genterapi og tverrfaglig kompetanse gir de hjelp til nye pasientergrupper og løfter norsk kompetanse innen gentilpasset behandling.

Les saken i VG her.

10th Cancer Crosslinks: Precision Treatment Reviewed

For the tenth time the cancer experts gathered to share knowledge and ideas at Oslo Cancer Cluster Innovation Park. Cancer Crosslinks 2018 presented a diverse program covering themes from immuno-oncology to cachexia, to big data.

 

Cancer research is changing rapidly. Immunotherapy and precision medicine has revolutionized cancer treatment. This year’s Cancer Crosslinks took a closer look at developments over the last decade, and highlighted “Precision Treatment: Exploiting Recent Advances – Fast and Furious?”.

Weber Gazed into the Crystal Ball
The leading immunotherapy expert professor Jeffrey S. Weber visited Cancer Crosslinks for a second time. Weber has worked with immunotherapy for 30 years.  He provided an overview on recent advances. He shared new data showing that the combination of a certain vaccine and a type of immunotherapy called Checkpoint inhibitors, are especially effective against cancer. He also gazed into the crystal ball and made predictions on the future of cancer treatment. Weber is optimistic and thinks there are several promising combinations of precision treatments on the horizon.  He believes we can hope for a survival rate of 70-80 percent for people with certain cancers.

A Fiber Diet is Recommendable
Professor Laure Bindels from Belgium explored the theme of Microbiome, Cancer and Cachexia. Diet can be an important tool to fight cancer and cancer symptoms. Her research on mice indicates that changing to a fiber-rich diet can prevent undernourishment and increase the survival rate for cancer patients.

Hege Russnes and Anne Hansen Ree introduced us to the MetAction project where they conduct extended personal diagnostic testing to give cancer patients better and more effective treatment.

From the USA, we were introduced to precision treatment of gynecological cancer from Douglas A. Levine.  He was followed by Professor Andreas Engert, who raised the hot topic of establishing joint European guidelines for treatment across Europe for hematological cancer.

A Big Maybe to Big Data
The last speakers of the day where Assistant Professor Marcela Maus from Harvard Medical School, and Elisabeth Wik and Marc Vaudel from the University of Bergen. Professor Maus explained the use of CAR T- cells in cancer treatment. CAR-T Cells are T-cells with modified receptors to make them more effective against certain diseases, in this case cancer.

Elisabeth Wik and Marc Vaudel, with backgrounds from cancer research and computer science, discussed the use of big data in cancer research and treatment. Will big data revolutionize cancer treatment? The answer is maybe. We don’t know yet, it has potential.  We need to continue exploration, research, and collaboration to find out.

Download the Presentations
For those of you who missed the event or would like to revisit:

You may watch most of the presentations here.

You can download presentations from the meeting here:

Opening and Welcome with Jutta Heix from Oslo Cancer Cluster and Anne Kjersti Fahlvik, Executive Director Innovation, The Norwegian Research Council.

Jeffrey S. Weber. Opening Keynote: Cancer Immunotherapy – The Journey So Far and Where We Are Heading.
Jeffrey S. Weber, Professor, Deputy Director and Co-Director, Melanoma Program, Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, USA.

Laure Bindels. International Keynote: The Microbiome, Cancer and Cachexia.
Laure Bindels, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium.

Hege G. Russnes and Anne Hansen ReeFrom Feasibility to Utility in Precision Medicine – Experiences from the first Norwegian Study of NGS-Based Therapy Decisions in Advanced Cancer.
Hege G. Russnes, Senior Consultant and Researcher, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Norway
Anne Hansen Ree, Professor, Akershus University Hospital, University of Oslo, Norway

Douglas A. Levine. International Keynote: Precision Medicine for Gynecologic Cancers – Opportunities and Obstacles.
Douglas A. Levine, Professor, Director of Gynecologic Oncology, Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center & Head, Gynecology Research Laboratory, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, USA.

Andreas Engert. International Keynote: Roadmap for European Hematology Research and Hodgkin Lymphoma: (Immuno)therapy, Late Effects and the Way Forward.
Andreas Engert, Professor for Internal Medicine, Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital of Cologne, Germany.

Marcela V. Maus. International Keynote: The Next Generation of Engineered T-cells for Immunotherapy of Hematological and Solid Tumors.
Marcela V. Maus, Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School & Director of Cellular Immunotherapy, Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA.

Marc Vaudel  and Elisabeth Wik: Making Sense of Big Data for Oncology Patients – Vision and Reality
Marc Vaudel, Center for Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital and KG Jebsen Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Norway
Elisabeth Wik, Centre for Cancer Biomarkers, University of Bergen and Department of Pathology, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway

Follow the 10th Cancer Crosslinks: Stream and Program

Thursday January the 18th it’s time for the 10th Cancer Crosslinks here at Oslo Cancer Cluster Innovation Park. Hospital personnel, researchers and everybody interested get together for an update on – and to discuss – the latest within cancer research.

 

This year’s conference will focus on Precision Treatment in cancer research with the headline: Exploiting Recent Advances – Fast and Furious?

Check out the program here.

 

Raising Prostate Cancer Awareness

This week on Monday, Prostate Cancer Day, the Norwegian Cancer Society initiated their Blue-Ribbon Campaign to raise prostate cancer awareness. In line with the campaign, Oslo Cancer Cluster gives you the chance to update yourselves on prostate cancer research Thursday the 30th of November.

 

The Blue-Ribbon campaign is initially a month’s focus on prostate cancer, one of the deadliest forms of cancers we know. On average, every day three people die of prostate cancer in Norway alone. Over the length of a year, that number climbs above 5000 and they are all exclusively male.

For 20 years the Pink-Ribbon Campaign has been synonymous with awareness of breast cancer, a form of cancer that almost exclusively affect women. The movement was a success and brought a lot of attention and money for breast cancer research. Now, the attention turns to men and prostate cancer.

Research Needed
— I think we will receive a lot of attention with this campaign. The disease affects so many and is under communicated. Men often keep this type of information to themselves. And importantly, we need more research on the subject, says Anne Lyse Ryel, Secretary General at the Norwegian Cancer Society.

First and foremost, the campaign aims to lift prostate cancer into the limelight. Subsequently lifting taboos and increasing awareness among men and the population at large. Next in line is money for research. It is severely needed because reaching 2030, estimates predict an 40 percent increase on the frequency of prostate cancer.

An Update on Prostate Cancer
However, research is very much ongoing. And, if you are wondering what the most current research on prostate cancer entails? Visit Oslo Cancer Cluster’s R&D Network Meeting that Thursday the 30th of November focuses on exactly prostate cancer research. It can serve as a very informative conclusion to a month of prostate cancer awareness. Listen to prominent experts explaining current research and where prostate cancer research is heading in the future.

Read more about our Prostate Cancer meeting.

Targovax Releases Positive Clinical Results

Targovax has received very positive results regarding the survival rate of patients with pancreatic cancer.

Immune-oncology aims to help the body’s own immune system fight cancer and the ambition is to address the unmet need for long-term survival for patients with advanced cancers.

13 of 13
The company specializes in immune-oncology and is a member of Oslo Cancer Cluster. It recently released information revealing that 13 of 13 test subjects where alive after one year of treatment in a stage two clinical trial study. In addition, an active immune response–meaning the immune system was triggered to attack the cancer–was observed in as much as 11 of 13 patients.

No allergic reactions
These results came after the number of test subjects were reduced from 19 to 13 to see if allergic reactions stalled with reduced dosages of the TG01; Targovax’s lead RAS immunotherapy product. And luckily, no serious allergic reactions were observed,

Magnus  Jäderberg MD, Chief Medical Officer of Targovax, said:

– We are delighted that we maintain a strong immune response and one-year survival rate with the reduced dosing  regimen, essentially  equivalent  to  and  consistent with the previously  reported data  from the  main cohort.

These new results are so positive that stock market analysts DnB Markeds predict a serious stock market rise for Targovax.

 

About Targovax

Arming the patient’s immune system to fight cancer

Targovax is a clinical stage company focused on developing and commercializing novel immuno-oncology therapies to target, primarily, treatment-resistant solid tumors. Immuno-oncology is currently one of the fastest growing therapeutic fields in medicine.

In July, 2016 the Company listed its shares on Oslo Axess.

Read more

 

International Collaboration in Cancer Innovation

24 oncology innovators from 9 international hubs attended the 6th International Cancer Cluster Showcase in San Diego.

 

The International Cancer Cluster Showcase (ICCS) was born back in 2011 in Washington DC, during the world’s largest biotech conference, BIO International Convention. International cluster managers and representatives from the oncology field in Boston, Toulouse and Oslo met during a networking reception and agreed to team up for a joint initiative to expose their emerging oncology innovators to the global oncology community gathering at BIO.

This idea matured in a stimulating and dynamic annual meeting featuring oncology innovators from several North American and European innovation hubs.


Exciting partnering opportunities
During the  6th edition of ICCS around 200 delegates learned about exciting partnering opportunities pitched by 24 companies from 9 innovation hubs.

Oslo Cancer Cluster was represented by its member companies Oncoimmunity AS and Nordic Nanovector. The two companies presented their preclinical and clinical candidates for treating hematological cancers. Inven2, Norway’ largest tech transfer organisation, gave a glimpse into their growing oncology portfolio.

An overwhelming amount of cutting edge oncology innovations from leading North American and European industry clusters were presented in compact presentations. Poster sessions, networking parts and a final reception allowed the participants to connect and discuss collaboration opportunities.

– I hope that the ICCS 2017 reception was as productive for the participating biotechs as the BIO reception in Washington 6 years ago was for the founders of ICCS, said Jutta Heix, International Advisor at Oslo Cancer Cluster and coordinator for the event.

Our International Work

Oslo Cancer Cluster aims to enhance the visibility of oncology innovation made in Norway by being a significant partner for international clusters, global biopharma companies and academic centres.

– Our goal is to support our members in their effort to attract international partners, investments and successful academia-industry collaborations, says International Advisor Jutta Heix.

Heix is responsible for the cluster’s international initiatives, cluster network and partnering activities.

– Back in 2008, Oslo Cancer Cluster was not visible internationally, and few people knew about oncology innovation in Norway. We began to seek out partners and actively approach international pharma companies and other clusters offering relevant synergies, says Heix.


Building relationships abroad

The relationships thrive on joint initiatives. These include invitations to Norway with tailored programmes, where potential collaboration partners can meet academic teams, start-ups and biotechs. Oslo Cancer Cluster has also joined forces with other hubs and clusters internationally.

One such collaboration is the International Cancer Cluster Showcase (ICCS) at the global biotechnology gathering BIO International Convention in the US. In 2017, it is arranged for the 6th time, with European and North American partners, including the Massachusetts Technology Transfer Center, The Oncopole in Québec, The Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, Medicen in Paris and BioCat in Catalonia.

– This year the ICCS will showcase 24 innovative oncology companies from nine international innovation hubs and clusters. Three of our member companies in Oslo Cancer Cluster will use the opportunity to pitch their products and ideas to a global oncology audience, says Heix.

Jutta Heix is Oslo Cancer Cluster’s international advisor.


European and Nordic arenas
Meeting places are important in Europe too, with BIO-Europe, BIO-Europe Spring and Nordic Life Science Days at the top of the list. Oslo Cancer Cluster is the oncology partner at the Nordic Life Science Days. As a region, the Nordic countries are of international importance in the field of cancer research and innovation, especially in precision medicine, and Oslo Cancer Cluster participates in advancing Nordic collaboration.

Oslo Cancer Cluster also engages in more cancer specific European events. One example is the Association for Cancer Immunotherapy Meeting (CIMT), which is the largest European meeting in the field of cancer immunotherapy, also known as immuno-oncology.

– Many of our members are active in the field of immuno-oncology, so for a couple of years we have organized an event called CIMT Endeavour with German partners. The aim here is to discuss and promote translational research and innovation in immuno-oncology, says Heix.


Hot topics

Cancer immunotherapy has had a major impact on cancer treatment and global research and development in the cancer field. The concept took off with the approval of the first immune-checkpoint inhibitor, called Ipilimumab, in 2011. It offered a ground breaking new treatment for melanoma. In 2013, Science Magazine defined cancer immunotherapy as the breakthrough of the year. Since then, immunotherapy has been dominating the agenda of oncology meetings.

Other hot research and development topics are precision medicine and the increased digitization of the health sector. Oslo Cancer Cluster incorporates these topics in the international work, and aims to expand the services it provides for its members. The cluster recently got funding from Innovation Norway to do this, by adding an EU-advisor to the team.

– We want to increase our members’ involvement in EU’s research and innovation programme Horizon 2020. The new EU-advisor will help our members identify relevant funding schemes, find partners and prepare the applications, says Heix.

This initiative has already started to show some results. In the spring of 2017, Oslo Cancer Cluster member OncoImmunity AS won a prestigious Horizon 2020 SME Instrument grant, tailored for small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). This grant targets innovative businesses with international ambitions — such as the bioinformatics company OncoImmunity.

 

New meeting places
– Member needs are important for us, as it is for clusters in general. Our network is for the benefit of our members. A good way of leveraging the network, is by creating relevant initiatives and new meeting places – to keep things moving forward, says Heix.

Oslo Cancer Cluster has new international initiatives coming up. One is in immuno-oncology, bringing Norwegian biotechs to the well-established research communities on the US East coast. The biotechs will get training and support, and will meet academic medical centres and biopharma companies in Boston and other cities. This initiative is supported by Innovation Norway’s Global Growth programme.

Another new initiative takes on academic innovation. More good ideas from academia should make it into patents, start-ups and investment opportunities for industry partners.

– Stanford University has a programme called SPARK. We are working with Norwegian partners, including The University of Oslo Life Science and The Norwegian Inflammation Network (NORIN), on implementing a Norwegian SPARK-programme. This will be part of the global SPARK-network, and we are already building a European node together with Berlin and Finland, Jutta Heix says.

Podcast on cancer research and development

Oslo Cancer Cluster member Radium Hospital Research Foundation, Radforsk, has launched their own podcast. The podcast is named Radium, and is about cancer research and development of new cancer treatments, as well as updates on Radforsk´s portfolio companies.

Radium has so far made nine episodes, and the ambition of Jónas Einarsson, CEO Radforsk and Elisabeth Kirkeng Andersen, communication manager in Radforsk, is to make one new episode a week. The podcasts are in Norwegian, if they do not interview people from abroad, as they did in the Cancer Crosslinks special.

Einarsson and Andersen is usually joined by guests in the studio, and so far they have had guests from Oslo Cancer Cluster members; PCI Biotech, Ultimovacs, Targovax, Vaccibody, Oncoinvent, as well as Roy Larsen and Øyvind Bruland, talking about Algeta, Nordic Nanovector and Oncoinvent.

Upcoming epiosodes will include guests such as Professor Håvard Danielsen from Institute for Cancer Genetics and Informatics, Anne Lise Ryel, General Secretary in the Norwegian Cancer Society and CEO, Kjetil Hestdal in Photocure.

Here you may find all podcast episodes launched so far.

Cancer Crosslinks 2017 will be streamed

Cancer Crosslinks 2017 on January 26th features a really interesting program with presentations from international and Norwegian thought leaders within cancer research.

For those of you that may not be present at the conference in the Oslo Cancer Cluster Innovation Park, you may watch the presentations as we will live stream from 9:15 – 16:15.

Close to 250 participants from all over Norway have signed up for this years Cancer Crosslinks. The program for the 9. th Cancer Crosslinks is divided in three parts; recent findings regarding cancer & inflammation, personalised cancer medicine within hematological cancers and the emerging field of real-world evidence.

Cancer Crosslinks is hosted by Oslo Cancer Cluster and sponsored by BMS and AbbVie.

Great interest in R&D Precision Cancer Medicine meeting

Over 50 people turned up for our R&D Network meeting on Precision Cancer Medicin at Stavanger University Hospital yesterday. The meeting was a collaboration beetween Oslo Cancer Cluster and Stavanger University Hospital(SUS) and was hosted by SUS.

The speaker list included Jon Arne Søreide from the Gastrointestinal Surgical Research Group, Bjørnar Gilje from the Reseach Group for Oncology and Medical Physics and Emiel Janssen from the research group at the Department of Pathology.

We were also fortunate to have Åslaug Helland from Oslo University Hospital (OUS) with us to give us some clinical perspectives. Helland is the group leader for the Research Group for Translation Studies on Solid Tumours. More info on Hellands group here

Representing the biotech side, we had Kjetil Hestdal from PhotoCure showing examples of the opportunities photodynamic technology give patients with bladder cancer.

Aslaug Aamodt Muggerud from MSD talked about biomarkers and how precision medicine is different from “traditional treatment”.

PERMIDES project going forward with project manager hired

Oslo Cancer Cluster and NCE Smart Energy Markets together with four European clusters in medicine and IT managed to land a prestigious Horizon 2020 EU project this spring. The official kick-off for the project is September 7th to 8th in Karlsrue and project manager Gupta Udatha is hired to work in both Oslo and Halden to implement the project from Norwegian side.

 

Project manager Gupta Udatha He works at both the Norwegian Centres of Expertise located in Eastern Norway, i.e. Oslo Cancer Cluster and Smart Innovation Østfold. The PERMIDES project aims at establishing fruitful collaborations between the bio-pharmaceutical and IT sectors in the European region to advance the field of personalised medicine through the development of novel digital solutions with cancer as the model disease.

– Gupta has an amazing background from bioinformatics and big data analytics of biopharmaceutical data. We are confident he is going to drive this project forward in a satisfactory way, says Ketil Widerberg, CEO Oslo Cancer Cluster and Dieter Hirdes, F & I Coordinator Smart Innovation Østfold company as a leader NCE Smart Cluster in a joint comment.

The PERMIDES project will start 1 September and with a kick-off meeting in Karlsruhe 7th to 8th September.

 

 

View presentations and videos from Cancer Crosslinks

Cancer Crosslinks 2016 featured cutting-edge presentations from leading American and Norwegian clinicians and researchers within the field of cancer immunotherapy. You may look at their presentations again or for the first time via following the links below.  You may also watch videos of some of the presentations.

 

Picture above: The three Cancer Crosslinks 2016 keynote speakers.  From left: Professor Renier Brentjens, Dr. Stefanie Spranger and Professor Gordon Freeman.
Photo: U-Casters.

 

Videos:

International keynote presentations:

National presentations:

Presentations are published by courtesy of the lecturers.

Cancer Crosslinks 2016 will be streamed

Cancer Crosslinks 2016 features a really interesting program. For those of you that may not take part of the actual conference in the Oslo Cancer Cluster Innovation Park, you may watch the whole program at your computer as we will live stream from 9:00 – 16:30.

Over 240 people from all over Norway have signed up for this years Cancer Crosslinks. The program focuses on immuno-oncology and features strong international thought leaders as presenters. Cancer Crosslinks is hosted by Oslo Cancer Cluster and sponsored by BMS and Janssen.

 

 

 

Cancer Crosslinks 2016 features thought leaders in immuno-oncology

Cancer Crosslinks 2016 on January 14 offers you an exciting program with international keynote speakers who made and make major contributions to advance immunotherapies against cancer. Already more than 120 delegates have signed up, but we have room for many more in the Kaare Norum Auditorium at Oslo Cancer Cluster Innovation Park. The conference is sponsored by BMS and Janssen.

 

 

The main theme for Cancer Crosslinks 2016 is: «The transversal impact of new treatments in Oncology and Hematology: tumor microenvironment, novel concepts, combinations and study design».

 

Some program highlights:

  • Professor Gordon Freeman, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, is one of the key persons behind today’s PD-1/ PD-L1 inhibitors. He will share his perspectives on PD-1 cancer immunotherapy. His talk will be complemented by case studies from Norway illustrating the broad impact of immune checkpoint inhibitors for a variety of cancers
  • Professor  Renier Brentjens, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, will shift the focus to hematological cancers and discuss the advancement of recombinant T-cell technologies including CAR-T-cell approaches for different indications. Norwegian experts will complement his talk with updates on novel immuno-oncology approaches being developed at UiO and OUS
  • Stefani Spranger from Professor Tom Gajewski’s lab, University of Chicago will provide the latest insights into the role of T-cell inflammed versus non-inflammed tumor microenvironment for immunotherapy
  • Last, but not least: a Norwegian patient will share his perspectives on the importance of novel cancer therapies

 

Travel expences
Participants working at hospitals and/or academic reserach centres whom have no sources for funding the participation will get flight or train ticket covered. How ever we do not cover local transportation to / from the airport. Flight or train tickets may be ordered by connecting to travel agency Berg-Hansen on e-mail:  bestilling@berg-hansen.no or phone  08050 between 08.00-17.00. The reference code is «OCC».

Large Oslo Cancer Cluster delegation to BIO2015

More than 15 Oslo Cancer Cluster members will be present at BIO2015 in Philadelphia in June. BIO is the world´s largest biotech fair and a very important partnering event for the cluster.

The companies attending BIO from the cluster are: BerGenBio, Lifandis, Lytix Biopharma, Nextera, Nordic Nanovector, Normetrix, Pharmalink Oncology, Inven2, BTO, Targovax, Ultimovacs, Vaccibody, The Radium Hospital Research Foundation, Chiltern and DNB Healthcare.

International Advisor Jutta Heix will represent Oslo Cancer Cluster Managment Team.

International Cancer Cluster Showcase
Oslo Cancer Cluster will also this year arrange International Cancer Cluster Showcase at BIO, together with other world-leading cancer clusters.  New partners are OBN, UK with a strong international investor network and the Wistar Institute from Philadelphia as local partner.

Member companies pitching at the International Cancer Cluster Showcase are Inven2, Ultimovacs and Nordic Nanovector.

Inven2, Norway´s largest TTO, will pitch their portfolio of early projects which is really strong in immuno-oncology, Ultimovacs will present the clinical development of their universal cancer vaccine, whilst Nordic Nanovector will present the clinical development of their targeted radiopharmaceutical treatment of lymphoma. Nordic Nanovector went public this March with one of the biggest IPO´s in European biotech so far this year.

We are very proud to have two Oslo Cancer Cluster members sponsoring the International Cancer Cluster Showcase this year: Chiltern and DNB Healthcare.

DNB Healthcare is also hosting a special healthcare event in New York on June 12 prior to BIO.

 

Ultimovacs, Inven2 and Nordic Nanovector will present at ICCS

Oslo Cancer Cluster will for the 4th time arrange International Cancer Cluster Showcase, ICCS in collaboration with leading cluster partners from Europe and North America. 20 oncology biotechs will pitch their latest innovations and partnering opportunities.

Member companies pitching at ICCS are Inven2, Ultimovacs and Nordic Nanovector:

  • Ultimovacs will present the clinical development of their universal cancer vaccine
  • Inven2, Norway´s largest TTO, will pitch highlights from their portfolio which is particularly strong in immuno-oncology
  • Nordic Nanovector will present their lead clinical-stage product opportunity Betalutin™, the first in a new class of Antibody-Radionuclide-Conjugates (ARCs).Nordic Nanovector went public this March with one of the biggest IPO´s in European biotech so far this year.

Below you may find some more information on this years edition of ICCS and BIO2015.

International Cancer Cluster Showcase 2015, June 15th, 2015 – Philadelphia Convention Center

General BIO Info:

  • BIO 2015 takes place in Philadelphia. From what we hear the hotels are filling up, so be sure to book your housing soon if you are attending
  • Oslo Cancer Cluster will not feature a booth this year, but International Advisor Jutta Heix will be present at BIO and participate in partnering meetings

 

 

View videos from Cancer Crosslinks 2015

At this years Cancer Crosslinks we made short video interviews with presenters Professor Paul Baas, Professor Nicholas Navin, Professor Bjørn Tore Gjertsen and Professor Kimmo Porkka on their research and views on cancer treatments in the future. You may watch them below.

We would like to thank the presenters for taking the time to share their knowledge and our sponsors Bristol-Myers Squibb and Roche for making it possible to produce these videos.

Presentation at one of the R&D Network meetings.

View presentations from Cancer Crosslinks

Cancer Crosslinks 2015 featured some very interesting, cutting-edge presentations from some of the leading cancer clinicians and researchers. Below we have listed the presentations that were held.

  • How to combine molecularly targeted therapies and emerging cancer immunotherapies based on molecular insights into the tumour?
    Paul Baas MD, PhD, Dept. of Thoraic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Investigating Clonal Diversity and Evolution in Breast Cancer with Single Cell Genomics
    Prof. Nicholas Navin, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston
  • Liquid biopsies – monitoring solid cancers in the blood: where are we today and how can these technologies affect clinical decision-making?
    Prof. Klaus Pantel, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany
  • Myeolid malignancies as models of oncogenesis – molecular characterization
    Henrik Hjort-Hansen, Dept. of Hematology, Inst. of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, St. Olav’s Hospital, NTNU, Trondheim
  • Hematology perspective
    Prof. Bjørn Tore Gjertsen, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway
  • Personalized therapy of chemorefractory AML and multiple myeloma
    Kimmo Porkka, Helsinki University Hospital Comprehensive Cancer Center, Dept. of Hematology and Hematology Research Unit, University of Helsinki, Finland
  • Clonal heterogeneity in epithelial malignancies: Challenges and clinical applications
    Prof. Manuel Teixeira, Portuguese Oncology Institute, Porto, Portugal
  • From targets to bullets in lymphoid malignancies
    Alexander Fosså MD, PhD, Dept. of Medical Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, the Norwegian Radium Hospital, Norway

 

 

 

 

 

Registration for Cancer Crosslinks 2015 is open

Cancer Crosslinks 2015 will be held January 15th at The Institute for Cancer Research at the Norwegian Radium Hospital. The program features several renowned international speakers as well as Norwegian experts. Main theme is “Novel insights into tumor heterogeneity and clonal evolution: how to design treatment and follow-up strategies”.

 

  • Program and registration form (close to the bottom of the page)
    Since the auditorium is usually fully booked for this event we limit the number of participants per company  to 2 people in the main auditorium. However,additional participants may follow the program from the seminar rooms and participate at lunch and networking parts. The meeting will also be streamed.

 

Exciting program bridging latest research and clinican implementation
In the first part of the program, international and Norwegian clinicians and researchers will discuss the clinical impact of approaches as single cell sequencing and liquid biopsies across different tumor types. We look forward to welcoming our keynote speakers Professor Nicholas Navin from MD Anderson and Professor Klaus Pantel from the University Hospital Hamburg–Eppendorf working at the international forefront in their fields

The second part deals with emerging treatment strategies integrating novel insights into tumor heterogeneity and building on both, molelularly targeted therapies and emerging cancer immunotherapies. You have the opportunity to hear recent insights from various tumor types and to discuss novel opportunities but also the challenges faced during the clinical implementation with our international and Norwegian speakers.

The third part is dedicated the patients perspective, where Anniken Golf Rokseth will share her story reminding all of us why we are putting our efforts into this area every day.

 

Welcome for the 7th time
Cancer Crosslinks 2015 is the seventh edition of this national meeting. This year’s event is hosted and developed in collaboration with BMS, Roche and the Norwegian Cancer Society. We thank our Program Committee with Bjørn Tore Gjertsen, Hans Petter Eikesdal, Christian Kersten and Ragnhild Lothe for their important contributions to the program development.

ICCS 2014: Cutting-edge oncology innovations

On June 22nd, one day prior to the BIO International Convention in San Diego, the International Cancer Cluster Showcase 2014 kicks off. The showcase is an opportunity to head-start the partnering at BIO 2014 and get the latest on what is going on in the cancer clusters of Oslo, Massachusetts, Quebec, Chicago, Toulouse, and the UK Golden Triangle.

For the 3rd time Oslo Cancer Cluster will present cutting edge innovations together with its international partners from North America and Europe. Oslo Cancer Cluster members selected to present at this year’s International Cancer Cluster Showcase (ICCS) are BerGenBio, PCI Biotech and Nextera.


ICCS – A winning concept

Previous ICCS-events have attracted 150 – 200 dedicated international oncology professionals. Positive feedback has encouraged Oslo Cancer Cluster and its international partners to continue with this meeting format. BerGenBio’s CEO Richard Godfrey says:

“The ICCS was a great start to BIO 2013, it was interesting to see the other cancer companies present and we made a few excellent contacts that otherwise we may not have connected with. I will certainly be present at ICCS 2014.”

This year two new partners, namely Cancer Campus from Villejuif and Stockholm-Uppsala Life Sciences are joining the ICCS and contribute to leverage the portfolio of oncology partnering opportunities. The International Cancer Cluster Showcase 2014 will be hosted at the San Diego Convention Centre, same site as the BIO 2014 will be hosted.

For information on presenting companies and registration, please see the ICCS conference website: www.internationalcancercluster.org.

 

BIO International Convention 23-26 June, 2014
Oslo Cancer Cluster will also be represented at the world’s largest biotech conference, BIO International Convention. This year the event is taking place on 23-26 June in San Diego, California at the San Diego Convention Center.

Oslo Cancer Cluster will share a centrally located booth with the other Nordic regions; Medicon Valley Alliance, Biopeople, Invest in Skåne and Copenhagen Capacity. All Oslo Cancer Cluster members may display material at the booth which will function as a central meeting place for the members, coordinated by the Oslo Cancer Cluster team.

Building strong international networks to stimulate collaboration, partnerships and thereby innovation for our members is a key strategic goal for Oslo Cancer Cluster.

More information about BIO 2014 is found at convention.bio.org.

Presentation at one of the R&D Network meetings.

The Radium Hospital Foundation support the R&D Network Meetings 2014

The Radium Hospital Foundation (Radiumhospitalets Legater) will support the Oslo Cancer Clusters R&D Network Meetings 2014, and collaborate closely with the cluster on developing these meetings.

Oslo Cancer Clusters R&D Network Meetings are the backbone of the clusters strategic goal to stimulate collaborations and partnership by further develop strong national and international networks.

Important for partnering and innovation
The R&D Network Meetings target the members and collaborators of the cluster and is usually held five to six times annually. Each R&D Network Meeting is focused on a specific oncology theme, featuring speakers and angles from basic research to pharma, encouraging interdiciplinary and multi-diciplinary comptence development and partnering.

“The R&D Network Meetings contribute to important networking for the researchers at the Radium Hospital. In addition it gives the participants the opportunity to keep up to date in the ever changing field of cancer research,” says Karl-Erik Giercksky, Clinical Advisor at the Radium Hospital Foundation.

Ketil Widerberg, General Manager of the Oslo Cancer Cluster is very grateful for the support: “The contribution from the Radium Hospital Foundation to our R&D Network Meetings is very important and will contribute to the importance of connecting the members of the cluster further. This is vital to drive and stimulate oncology innovations for the benefit of the cancer patients.”

The Radium Hospital Foundation
The Radium Hospital Foundation is built from gifts and donations given from people, organisations and large companies alike. These contributions enable The Radium Hospital to maintain their place as a world leading Comprehensive Cancer Center by supporting cancer research and excellent patient care.

Find more information on the Radium Hospital Foundation here.

 

R&D Network Meetings 2014

March 5th: Urologic Cancer

April 23rd: Personalised Medicine Workshop

August 20th: R&D Summer Meeting
Featuring presentations of the new members; New Kids on the Block

October 22nd: Conjugated antibodies

December 10th: Christmas R&D Network Meeting

Presentations from Cancer Crosslinks 2014

Cancer Crosslinks 2014, January 23, was the 6th edition of this annual oncology conference bringing together hematologists, oncologists and the industry in Norway.

This years conference was developed and hosted in collaboration with partners BMS, Amgen and the Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital. The feedback from the more than 220 participants was as always very positive, and we promise to come back with a even more exciting 7th edition of Cancer Crosslinks in January 2015.

The main presentations featured at Cancer Crosslinks 2014 are unfortunately no longer available online. Here is a list of the presentations that were held.


Opening Keynotes:

“Opportunities, challenges and visions for cancer research and treatment”
Prof. Kjell Magne Tveit, Head of Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital

“Current trends in oncology drug development”
Prof. Gunnar Sæter, Head of the Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital

Main session: New treatment modalities – need for a multidisciplinary approach

International Keynote:
“Cancer immunotherapies – novel treatment opportunities and their implications”
Prof. Mario Sznol, Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, USA

International Keynote:

“Multidisciplinary collaboration for patient-centric oncology”
Prof. Cornelis van de Velde, Leiden University Medical Centre, Netherlands, ECCO President

“Optimizing treatment for each patient: MetAction as a Norwegian initiative”
Kjetil Boye MD, PhD; Oslo University Hospital as representative for the MetAction team